Articles from Mike's blog at coachingbymike.uk

6 keys on 'How to be a tennis parent' from Lynette Federer

Taken and adapted from a facebook post from South African tennis coach Frans Cronje.  Exclusive tips on how to be a tennis parent.

1.  It's important that the child enjoys the game and isn't forced into it

"I believe a child choses tennis because he or she is attracted and fascinated by the sport, and that could be through the parents, friends or family"

2.  Discipline is part of the game

Episode 8 of the Curious Cows podcast with Simon Wheatley, Coach Education and Player Development Consultant

Hello!

I'd be delighted if you are able to spend half an hour or so of your precious time listening to Episode 8 of the Curious Cows podcast with Simon Wheatley, Coach Education and Player Development Consultant.  Simon is the archetypal 'Curious Cow' constantly challenging herd wisdom in all he does.  Here we have a wide ranging discussion on the tennis (and particularly coaching) industry and with so much on the agenda we did it in two parts.

Here is part 1 (you can also find it on your favourite podcast app - google, apple, spotify)


What's in our control?

We often talk about 'control the controllables' right?

So what can we control?  Here's 10 for starters:

1.  Stand up straight with your shoulders back (open yourself up to the world)

2.  Keep showing up

3.  Judge less, encourage more

4.  Empty the tank (give 100% of what you've got on the day)

5.  Stick to your principles

6.  Keep listening and learning 

7.  Park the ego 

8.  Smile more

9.  Catch your self-talk (notice the language and change the tone)

10.  Run for every darn ball


Talking less about the winning

I follow 'The Daily Stoic - ancient wisdom for everyday life'.

Very much recommend it.

Lifted directly from yesterday's post:

'It's a strange paradox.  The people who are most successful in life, who accomplish the most, who dominate their professions don't care that much about winning.  Certainly they talk about it less.

How could that be?

It's that they are after something higher than that.  Their goal is to "be best".  Not the best, but best.  They're after mastery - self-mastery.  They're after maximising their potential.

The difficulty in 'climbing'

Reaching a personal summit involves a climb.  

As does achieving any goal.

A goal wouldn't be a goal if it wasn't a genuine stretch and not just the logical next step.

So you gotta get your thermos, boots, ropes, harness, carabiners and start.

And tip number 1 is....

Stop looking at everyone else....the climb itself is tough enough.



Overcoming fear

One of our biggest fears is that of the 'unknown'.

But weirdly, that's why we compete.  Because we don't know the outcome.  

That's the attraction.

The buzz.

The nerves.

The feeling in the pit of the stomach.

The heavy legs.

The risk of 'loss'.

The fear of losing.

THIS 'fear' we have to embrace.

And how do we do this?

Well looking back to yesterday's post, let's start with 'standing up straight with your shoulders back!'

Some thoughts on 'winning'

You play the game to win. 

Yes, that's the objective of most games.

But how we 'play to win' becomes so very important.

So while you play, play in a way so that you get better at playing the game.

You want to push yourself because that's how you get better, so you need 'competition' to push yourself.

You need the risk of loss.

But here's an even better way of thinking about it....you play the game so you don't only get better at the game, but that you get better at the entire set of games (life).

Wanting the 'outcome' but not prepared to be part of the 'process'

I think I picked this up from a recent Judy Murray post somewhere on social media.

The idea that we might be wanting the outcome but not being prepared to be part of the process.

I love the idea of being able to play the guitar - an outcome.  

So I tried it.

Once.

I was horrible. My sausage fingers got in the way.  It was hard.

So I quit.  I was not prepared to stick at the process.  Even for a second session!  I clearly didn't want it 'that' badly.

So how badly do you want it?

Whatever your 'outcome goal' is?

When the possible outcome becomes too 'magical'

That's when pressure bears down on you too hard.

When the possible outcome becomes too magical.

There's too much attached to it.

It's too loaded.

It leads to a desperate, panicky energy where it's tough to listen to the right inner voice.


Episode 7 of the Curious Cows Podcast with Matt Rogan author of 'All To Play For - How Sport Can Reboot our Future'

So pleased to speak with Matt Rogan on episode 7 of the Curious Cows podcast. Matt and I have a wide ranging conversation about sport & the business of sport in which he shares his extensive experience. We also talk about his newly launched book 'All To Play For - How Sport Can Reboot our Future' which already has had fantastic reviews and I very much recommend it goes to the top of your reading list in this amazing summer of sport!

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